Issues in Contemporary Critical Theory II

Course Code: 
CPLT 502
Semester: 
Spring
Course Type: 
Core
P: 
3
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
8
Course Language: 
English
Courses given by: 
Course Objectives: 
The study of concepts and assumptions present in contemporary views of literature. Some crucial issues such as the following are discussed with reference to major critical theories.
Course Content: 

The aim is to give students an overview of some of the main theories and critics in the area of postmodernism, poststructuralism, and postcolonialism.

Teaching Methods: 
1: Lecture, 2: Question-Answer, 3: Discussion, 4: Simulation, 5: Case Study
Assessment Methods: 
A: Testing, B: Class Performance, C: Homework, D: Presentation

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes Program Outcomes Teaching Methods Assessment Methods
1) To address various issues in contemporary critical theory. 1-4, 7, 9-10 1,3 B,C
2) To analyse the concept of postmodernism. 1-4, 7, 9-10 1,3 B,C
3) To explore the historical aspects of postcolonialism. 1-4, 7, 9-10 1,3 B,C
4) To discuss the development of poststructuralism. 1-4, 7, 9-10 1,3 B,C
5) To compare and analyse contemporary novels using critical theory. 1-4, 7, 9-10 1,3 B,C
6) To explain the writer’s concern with the individual. 1-4, 7, 9-10 1,3 B,C

Course Flow

COURSE CONTENT
Week Topics Study Materials
1 Introduction  
2 Julia Kristeva, “Approaching Abjection”  
3 Michel Foucault, “What is an Author?”  
4 Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, “Can the Subaltern Speak?”  
5 Jean-François Lyotard, “Answering the Question, What is Postmodernism”

Jean Baudrillard, “Simulations”

 
6 Derrida, “Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences”

Jacques Lacan, “The Mirror Stage”

 
7 Sandra M. Gilbert, “Plain Jane’s progress”  
8 Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, “Three Women’s texts and a Critique of Imperialism”  
9 Luce Irigaray, “Women on the Market”  
10 Judith Butler, “Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay in Phenomenology and feminist Theory”  
11 Homi Bhabha, “The other Question”  
12 Deleuze and Guattari, “What Is a Minor Literature?”  
13 Student Presentations  
14 Student Presentations  
15 Student Presentations  

Recommended Sources

RECOMMENDED SOURCES
Textbook Modern Literary Theory (eds. Philip Rice and Patricia Waugh)
Additional Resources Margaret Atwood (e.g. The Handmaid’s Tale/ Alias Grace/The Robber Bride/The Heart goes Last, etc.)

Louis de Bernieres (Captain Corelli’s Mandolin/Birds without Wings/The Dust that Falls from Dreams)

Philippa Gregory (The Other Boleyn Girl, etc.)

Hanif Kureishi (The Black Album/The Buddha of Suburbia)

Hillary Mantel (Wolf Hall)

Ian MacEwan (e.g. Atonement)

Toni Morrison (e.g. Beloved)

Salman Rushdie (e.g. Midnight’s Children/The Moor’s last Sigh/ The Enchantress of Florence( Shame etc.)

Meera Syal (Life isn’t all Ha Ha Hee Hee/Anita and Me)

Zadie Smith (White Teeth/NW/Swing time)

Assessment

ASSESSMENT
IN-TERM STUDIES NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Class Performance 1 50
Final Paper 1 50
Total   100
CONTRIBUTION OF FINAL PAPER TO OVERALL GRADE   50
CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE   50
Total   100

Course’s Contribution to Program

COURSE'S CONTRIBUTION TO PROGRAM
No Program Learning Outcomes Contribution
1 2 3 4 5  
1 The ability to apply knowledge of an example of world literature and social sciences to topics including culture, society, ethics, politics etc.     X      
2 The ability to review, analyze and apply the relevant literature.       X    
3 The ability to carry out interdisciplinary reading and analysis.       X    
4 The ability to utilize the basic concepts and issues of literary theories in developing life strategies       X    
5 Awareness of professional ethics and responsibility   X        
6 Effective communication skills.   X        
7 A sufficiently broad education to understand the global and social impact of literary movements.       X    
8 An awareness of the importance of lifelong learning and the ability to put it into practice.   X        
9 A knowledge of issues in contemporary literature and of the cultural issues of the period.       X    
10 The ability to use sources and modern tools in order to carry out research in the areas of literature and aesthetics.       X    

ECTS

ECTS ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT WORKLOAD BY THE COURSE DESCRIPTION
Activities Quantity Duration
(Hour)
Total
Workload
(Hour)
Course Duration (Including the exam week: 15x Total course hours) 15 3 45
Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice) 15 6 90
Presentation 2 15 30
Final Paper 1 35 35
Total Work Load     200
Total Work Load / 25 (h)     8.0
ECTS Credit of the Course     8