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Course Code: 
CPLT 510
Semester: 
Spring
Course Type: 
Core
P: 
3
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
8
Course Language: 
English
Courses given by: 
Course Objectives: 
The aim of this course is to discuss and analyse canonical Victorian novels in their social, political, economic, psychological background.
Course Content: 

Given the richness of the material to be studied, the novels will be grouped thematically, such as: the Other in Victorian novels, Bildungsroman and children’s literature, the journey theme as metaphor for youth, women, class and work, professions for women-the archetypal governess, women, class and work, Victorian novel and its metaphorical traumas, etc. Novels by Dickens, the Brontes, G. Eliot, Thackeray, M.E. Braddon, etc. will be studied and discussed form different theoretical perspectives.

Teaching Methods: 
1: Lecture, 2: Question-Answer, 3: Discussion, 4: Simulation, 5: Case Study
Assessment Methods: 
A: Testing, B: Class Performance, C: Homework, D: Presentation

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes Program Outcomes Teaching Methods Assessment Methods
1) To explore the history of Victorian literature.  1-3, 5-6, 8-9 1,2,3 B,C,D
2) For the students to gain knowledge in the intellectual and cultural background of Victorian literature and to become equipped with the concepts and terminology used in the analysis of literary texts. 1-3, 5-6, 8-9 1,2,3 B,C,D
3) To equip the students with the necessary critical faculties, analytical approach, interdisciplinary vision and analytical, interpretative and inference skills for a successful understanding of Victorian novels. 1-3, 5-6, 8-9 1,2,3 B,C,D
4) To analyze different definitions of Victorian literature. 1-3, 5-6, 8-9 1,2,3 B,C,D
5) To discuss and contrast different positions in Victorian literature. 1-3, 5-6, 8-9 1,2,3 B,C,D

 

Course Flow

COURSE CONTENT
Week Topics Study Materials
1 General Introduction to Victorian Era.  
2 General Introduction to Victorian Era.  
3 The ‘Other’ in Victorian Novels: Gypsies, Jews, and eccentric femininity versus honourable masculinity: two of the following texts: The Spanish Gypsy-G. Eliot, Daniel Deronda-G. Eliot, The Mill on the Floss-G. Eliot, The Vale of the Cedars or the Martyr-Grace Aguilar, Jane Eyre-C. Bronte, E. Bronte-Wuthering Heights.  
4 The ‘Other’ in Victorian Novels: Gypsies, Jews, and eccentric femininity versus honourable masculinity: two of the following texts: The Spanish Gypsy-G. Eliot, Daniel Deronda-G. Eliot, The Mill on the Floss-G. Eliot, The Vale of the Cedars or the Martyr-Grace Aguilar, Jane Eyre-C. Bronte, E. Bronte-Wuthering Heights  
5 Bildungsroman and children’s literature in exemplary novels-from Tom Jones to Great expectations: two of the following: Waverley-W. Scott, David Copperfield-C. Dickens, Great Expectations-C. Dickens, Middlemarch-G. Eliot  
6 Bildungsroman and children’s literature in exemplary novels-from Tom Jones to Great expectations: two of the following: Waverley-W. Scott, David Copperfield-C. Dickens, Great Expectations-C. Dickens, Middlemarch-G. Eliot  
7 The Journey theme as metaphor for youth in the 18th and 19th century English novel: two of the following: Caleb Williams-W. Godwin, Tom Jones-H. Fielding, Waverley-W. Scott, Jane Eyre-C. Bronte  
8 The Journey theme as metaphor for youth in the 18th and 19th century English novel: two of the following: Caleb Williams-W. Godwin, Tom Jones-H. Fielding, Waverley-W. Scott, Jane Eyre-C. Bronte  
9 Victorian novel and its metaphoric traumas: two of the following: Great Expectations-C. Dickens, The Woman in White, The Moonstone-W. Collins, C. Bronte-J. Eyre  
10 Victorian novel and its metaphoric traumas: two of the following: Great Expectations-C. Dickens, The Woman in White, The Moonstone-W. Collins, C. Bronte-J. Eyre  
11 Professions for women-the archetypal governess in the 19th century novel: two of the following: Caroline Mordaunt-Mrs. Sherwood, The Governess-Lady Blessington, Deerbrook-H. Martineau, Amy Herbert-Elizabeth Missing, Agnes Grey-A. Bronte  
12 Professions for women-the archetypal governess in the 19th century novel: two of the following: Caroline Mordaunt-Mrs. Sherwood, The Governess-Lady Blessington, Deerbrook-H. Martineau, Amy Herbert-Elizabeth Missing, Agnes Grey-A. Bronte  
13 Women, class and work: two of the following: Cassandra-F. Nightingale, Lady Audley’s Secret-M.E. Braddon, Jane Eyre, Shirley, Villette-C. Bronte  
14 Women, class and work: two of the following: Cassandra-F. Nightingale, Lady Audley’s Secret-M.E. Braddon, Jane Eyre, Shirley, Villette-C. Bronte  
15 CONCLUSION  

Recommended Sources

RECOMMENDED SOURCES
Textbook  
Additional Resources
  1. Decolonizing Feminisms-Race, Gender, and Empire Building-Laura E. Donaldson
  2. Colonial and Post-colonial Literature: Migrant Metaphors-Elleke Boehmer
  3. The Female Malady: Women, Madness and English Culture-E. Showalter
  4. A Literature of Their Own: British Women Novelists from Charlotte Bronte to Doris Lessing-E. Showalter
  5. The Madwoman in the Attic-The Woman Writer and the 19th Century Literary Imagination-S. Gilbert and S. Gubar
  6. ‘The Victorians’ in “The Penguin History of Literature”-A. Polland
  7. Nineteenth Century Realism-Through the Looking Glass-K. Kearns
  8. The English Novel-Form and Function-D. Van Ghent
  9. Victorian Renovations of the Novel-Narrative Annexes and the Boundaries of Representation-S. Keen
  10. English Fiction of the Victorian Period-M. Wheeler
  11. The Bronte Myth-L. Miller
  12. Gendering Orientalism-R. Lewis
  13. Uneven Developments: The Ideological Work of Gender in Mid-Victorian England-M. Poovey
  14. Their Proper Sphere-A Study of the Bronte Sisters as early Victorian Female Novelists-I.S. Ewbank
  15. Eminent Victorian Women-E. Longford
  16. A  Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction: Mapping History’s Nightmares-R. Mighall
  17. Marriage and Morals among the Victorians-G. Himmelfarb
  18. Dickens: The Orphan Condition-B. Hochman and I. Wachs
  19. Orphan Texts: Victorian Orphans, Culture and Empire-L. Peters

Assessment

ASSESSMENT
IN-TERM STUDIES NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Presentation 1 30
Class Performance 1 30
Final Paper 1 40
Total   100
CONTRIBUTION OF FINAL PAPER TO OVERALL GRADE   40
CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE   60
Total   100

Course’s Contribution to Program

COURSE'S CONTRIBUTION TO PROGRAM
Program Learning Outcomes Contribution  
1 2 3 4 5  
The ability to apply knowledge of English and world literature and social sciences to topics including culture, society, ethics, politics etc.     X      
The ability to review, analyse and apply the relevant literature.       X    
The ability to carry out interdisciplinary reading and analysis.       X    
The ability to utilise the basic concepts and issues of literary theories in developing life strategies   X        
Awareness of professional ethics and responsibility       X    
Effective communication skills.     X      
A sufficiently broad education to understand the global and social impact of literary movements.   X        
An awareness of the importance of lifelong learning and the ability to put it into practice.     X      
A  knowledge of issues in contemporary literature and of the cultural issues of the period.       X    
The ability to use sources and modern tools in order to carry out research in the areas of literature and aesthetics.   X        

ECTS

ECTS ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT WORKLOAD BY THE COURSE DESCRIPTION
Activities Quantity Duration
(Hour)
Total
Workload
(Hour)
Course Duration (Including the exam week: 15x Total course hours) 15 3 45
Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice) 15 6 90
Presentation 1 20 20
Final Paper 1 45 45
Total Work Load     200
Total Work Load / 25 (h)     8.0
ECTS Credit of the Course     8