• TR
  • EN
Program Type: 
Thesis
Non Thesis
Course Code: 
POLS 515
Semester: 
Spring
Course Type: 
Core
P: 
3
Lab: 
0
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
8
Course Language: 
English
Course Coordinator: 
Course Objectives: 

The goals of this course for each student is to
a) gain a comprehensive overview of the main theories of International Relations and the directions in which IR has moved since the beginning of the discipline;
b) be able to recognize and discuss the theories in relation to various foreign policies.

Course Content: 

This course in International Relations Theory assumes a fundamental understanding of the theories of International Relations, usually obtained in undergraduate study. It will thus focus on taking the student deeper into the issues and challenges currently faced in the field, especially the fundamental changes from mid-20th century, Cold War philosophical commitment to positivism and foundationalism to contemporary post-modern and post-structuralist epistemological understandings of thought. alternatiflere odaklanılacaktır.

Teaching Methods: 
1: Lecture, 2: Discussion based lecture, 3: Case study, 4: Small group work, 5: Seminar, 6: Group work, 7: Research paper, 8: Oral presentation/exam, 9: Survey, 10: Panel, 11: Guest speaker, 12: Activities within a Student Body or Research Project.
Assessment Methods: 
A: Exam, B: Homework, C: Oral exam or presentation, D: Discussion.

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes Program

Learning Outcomes

Teaching Methods Assessment Methods
  1. identify various IR theories encountered in the course;
1 ,2 1,2,3,12 A,B,C
  1. distinguish the key authors of the theories in their historical context;
1, 2, 4 1,2,3,12 A,B,C
  1. describe the respective theories in some detail.
1, 3, 7 1,2,3,12 A,B,C
  1. compare and contrast one school of thought with another;
4, 6, 7, 12 1,2,3,12 A,B,C
  1. analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the various theories;
3, 5, 6 1,2,3,12 A,B,C
  1. articulate a preference for one theory or family of theories;
5, 7, 8 1,2,3,12 A,B,C
  1. argue a position on behalf of a given socio-political situation;
9, 10, 12 1,2,3,12 A,B,C
  1. identify key dates, countries and capitals of international politics.
4, 6, 10 1,2,3,12 A,B,C

Course Flow

COURSE CONTENT
Week Topics Study Materials
1 Course overview, administrative issues. syllabus
2 Review of syllabus, pretest, and overview of the textbook; IR THEORY Viotti & Kauppi, chapter 1; Walt, Stephen
3 REALISM Viotti & Kauppi:

Chapter 2; Thucydides; Morgenthau.

4 LIBERALISM Viotti & Kauppi:Chapter 3; Wilson, Woodrow; Doyle, Michael
5 ECONOMIC STRUCTURALISM Viotti & Kauppi:Chapter 4; Wallerstein, Immanuel
6 CLASSICAL MARXISM Reading to be handed out in class
7 THE ENGLISH SCHOOL Viotti & Kauppi:Chapter 5; Bull, Hedley
8 MIDTERM EXAMINATION --
9 OVERVIEW OF INTERPRETIVE UNDER-STANDINGS OF IR THEORY Viotti & Kauppi:Chapter 6; Wendt, Alexander
10 POST-POSITIVIST CONSTRUCTIONS Viotti & Kauppi:Chapter 7; Booth, Ken
11 FEMINISM(S) IN IR THEORY Viotti & Kauppi:Chapter 8; Tickner, Ann J.
12 NORMATIVE CONSIDERATIONS

 

Viotti & Kauppi:

Chapter 9; Kant, Immanuel

13 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY Reus-Smit & Snidal

Chapter 31

14 Review  
15 Conclusions --

Recommended Sources

RECOMMENDED SOURCES
Textbook VIOTTI, Paul R. and Mark V. KAUPPI (2010) International Relations Theory, 4th edition. New York and London: Pearson.
Additional Resources ADLER, Emanuel (2001) ‘Constructivism and International Relations’ in in Handbook of International Relations, W. Carlsnaes, T. Risse, B. A. Simmons, eds., Los Angeles and London: Sage Publications, pp. 95-118.

BAYLIS, John, Steve SMITH and Patricia OWENS (2008) The Globalization of World Politics, 4th edition. Oxford: OUP.

BURCHILL, Scott, et al (2005) Theories of International Relations, 3rd edition. New York and Houndsmills, UK: Palgrave.

CARR, Edward Hallett  (1946 [1939]) The Twenty Years’ Crisis, 1919-1939: An Introduction to the Study of International Relations. New York and London: Harper and Row.

CARLSNAES, Walter, Thomas RISSE, and Beth A. SIMMONS, eds. (2007) Handbook of International Relations. Los Angeles and London: Sage Publications.

CLARK, Ian and Over B. NEUMANN (1996) Classical Theories of International Relations. London and New York: MacMillan.

CURTIS, Michael, editor (1981 [1962]) The Great Political Theories: A Comprehensive Selection of the Crucial Ideas in Political Philosophy,  vols. 1 and 2. New York and London: Harper Perennial/Modern Classics.

DOUGHERTY, James E. and Robert L. Pfalzgraff, Jr. (1997) Contending Theories of International Relations. New York and Harlow, England: Longman.

DUNNE, Tim, Milja KURKI and Steve SMITH (2007) International Relations Theories: Discipline and Diversity. (Oxford: OUP).

ELSHTAIN, Jean Beth (2009) ‘Woman, the State and War’ in International Relations, 23(2): 289-303.

FEARON, James and Alexander WENDT (2002) ‘Rationalism v. Constructivism: A Skeptical View’ in Handbook of International Relations, W. Carlsnaes, T. Risse, B. A. Simmons, eds., Los Angeles and London: Sage Publications, pp. 52-72.

GRIFFITHS, Martin (1999) Fifty Key Thinkers in International Relations. New York and London: Routledge.

GRIFFITHS, Martin and Terry O’CALLAGHAN (2002) International Relations: Key Concepts. London and New York: Routledge.

JACKSON, Robert and Georg SORENSEN (2007) Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approaches, 3rd edition. Oxford: OUP.

LINKLATER, Andrew (2001) ‘The English School’ in S. Burchill, A. Linklater, et al., Theories of International Relations, London: Macmillan, pp. 93-118.

MEARSHEIMER, John J. (1994/95) ‘The False Promise of International Institutions’ in International Security, 19/3, pp. 5-49.

__________. (2001) The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. New York and London: Norton.

MINGST, Karen A. (2004) Essentials of International Relations, 3rd edition. New York and London: Norton.

MINGST, Karen A. and Jack SNYDER. (2001) Essential Readings in World Politics. New York and London: Norton.

MORGENTHAU, Hans J. (2006 [1948]) Politics Among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace, 7th ed. Boston: McGraw Hill.

REUS-SMIT, Christian, and Duncan SNIDAL, eds. (2010) The Oxford Handbook of International Relations, Oxford, OUP.

SCHMIDT, Brian C. (2002) ‘On the History and Historiography of International Relations’ in Handbook of International Relations, W. Carlsnaes, T. Risse, B. A. Simmons, eds., Los Angeles and London: Sage Publications, pp. 3-22.

SMITH, Steve, Tim DUNNE and Milja KURKI (2007) International Relations Theories: Discipline and Diversity. Oxford: OUP.

WALT, Stephen M. (Spring 1998) ‘International Relations: One World, Many Theories’ in Foreign Policy, no. 110, pp. 29-46.

WALTZ, Kenneth N. (2001 [1954]) Man, the State and War: A Theoretical Analysis. New York: Columbia University Press.

__________. (2008) Realism and International Politics. New York and London: Routledge.

WENDT, Alexander (1999) Social Theory of International Politics. Cambridge: CUP.

__________. (Spring 1992) ‘Anarchy is what States make of it: The Social Construction of Power Politics’ in International Organization 46/2.

WIGHT, Colin (2002) ‘Philosophy of Social Science and International Relations’ in Handbook of International Relations, W. Carlsnaes, T. Risse, B. A. Simmons, eds., Los Angeles and London: Sage Publications, pp. 23-51.

Material Sharing

MATERIAL SHARING
Documents  
Assignments Weekly Essay preparation
Exams Midterm, Final

Assessment

ASSESSMENT
IN-TERM STUDIES NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Mid-terms 1 25
Quizzes 12 50
Total   75
CONTRIBUTION OF FINAL EXAMINATION TO OVERALL GRADE  1 25
CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE   75
Total   100

Course’s Contribution to Program

COURSE'S CONTRIBUTION TO PROGRAM
No Program Learning Outcomes Contribution
1 2 3 4 5  
1 To demonstrate the ability to specialize and expand knowledge in the fields of political science, international relations, comparative politics, Turkish politics and foreign policy.         x  
2 The ability to comprehend the interdisciplinary quality of the political science and international relations discipline.         x  
3 A command of basic research models and approaches of political science and international relations discipline and the ability to apply them in academic research and project design.     x      
4 Having the ability to assess and interpret the different political and societal systems with an interdisciplinary approach.         x  
5 Having a command of qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis methods and abiding by the highest levels of academic and research ethics. x          
6 The ability to present and debate an issue that requires specialization in the field of political science and international relations. The ability to discuss this issue within an intellectual framework, and the ability to express oneself in a professional and academic manner.       x    
7 The ability to analyze and critically evaluate basic research models, approaches and intellectual traditions in the field of political science, international relations.         x  
8 The ability to utilize academic writing and presentation skills to projects, dissertations and articles.   x        
9 Having advanced reading, writing, comprehension and speaking skills in the English language.     x      
10 Having the ability to apply knowledge of political science and international relations discipline to information technologies and traditional tools so as to produce sound solutions to problems. x          
11 Possessing experience and social skills necessary for employment in the public and private sectors and/or being admitted to a competitive Ph.D. program.   x        
12 Having empathy towards diverse and differing communities, which will facilitate conducing teamwork at local as well as global platforms.   x        
13 Having competency of comprehending and interpreting local and global issues through information exchange with international academics and students. x          

ECTS

ECTS ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT WORKLOAD BY THE COURSE DESCRIPTION
Activities Quantity Duration
(Hour)
Total
Workload
(Hour)
Course Duration (Including the exam week: 16x Total course hours) 16 3 48
Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice) 16 5 80
Mid-terms 1 20 20
Homework 16 2 32
Final examination 1 20 20
Total Work Load     200
Total Work Load / 25 (h)     8
ECTS Credit of the Course     8